Basically, Moments are EQ and noise cancellation presets that you can enable based on your environment. You can have different settings for your commute, in public and in private. There’s also a fourth option called “My Moment” that you can adjust how you see fit. And instead of remembering what those were, you can save them for easy access on the headphones themselves, without having to fire up the app to change modes. The headphones themselves can analyze noise to try and detect which location you’re in before switching to the appropriate Moment — a feature called SmartSound. This tool worked for me for the most part, though a few times it selected public instead of commute. It was much better at gauging when I was in a quiet or “private” setting. Like many features on the Elite 85h, you can turn SmartSound off if you don’t want to use it.

Inside the Sound+ app, you can quickly change the ANC mode and adjust the EQ sliders or choose one of six EQ presets. The software will also show you what all the on-board controls do, allow you to change your voice assistant preference, help you find your headphones if you lose them and more. The Elite 85h offers on ear detection, a feature that senses whether or not you’re wearing the headphones. When active, you can automatically answer calls or resume audio simply by putting them on. It’s handy, but Jabra gives you the choice to turn it off completely inside the app.

Unlike some headphones, the EQ tools make a noticeable difference in the tuning. The default sound profile is fine, but you can definitely improve it with the EQ sliders and presets. Or at least, you can tweak it to fit your taste. After testing all the premade options, I found manually adjusting the curve was best for me: more bass, a little more mid and a touch more treble. With that change, hip-hop, electronic music and metal had the thump it needs without overpowering everything else. I found the sweet spot for things like Com Truise’s Persuasion System, Denzel Curry’s ZUU and Gojira’s Magma. All of which are best served loud and bassy.

Jabra Elite 85h

The Elite 85h also handles softer genres like bluegrass well, with a nice clarity and depth to the instrumentation that keeps things from sounding compressed and muddy. With Punch Brothers’ All Ashore album and anything with an upright bass, the low end can get boomy if you aren’t careful, and I had to adjust the EQ so that it wasn’t too overpowering. The default setting is nice for this genre, but the more aggressive styles I mentioned tended to feel flat. It’s nice that you can make these changes with the help of an app, but at the same time, you also shouldn’t have to. On truly great headphones, the default tuning would handle all genres well.

Jabra promises a whopping 36 hours of battery life with ANC on, six hours more than Sony’s 1000XM3 and 16 hours more than Bose’s QC35 II. Turn off noise cancellation and the company says you can expect up to 41 hours between charges. Basically, if you can limit yourself to 7 hours a day (lol), you can listen to these all week (five days) before you’ll need to charge them. To me, that’s ridiculous, and during my tests, I found out just how outrageous it was. Starting with a full charge, I used the Elite 85h for around 2-3 hours a day for seven days — with a weekend-long break thrown in. At that point, I still had 85 percent left, according to the Sound+ app. Needless to say, you won’t be reaching for that USB-C cable very often. And like many headphones nowadays, the Elite 85h has a quick-charge feature that will give you five hours of use in 15 minutes if you completely run them down.

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